Coaches

Dan Quinn
Head Coach

Biography

Dan Quinn was named the 16th head coach in Atlanta Falcons history in February of 2015. In two years, he has compiled a 19-13 regular season record and a 2-1 postseason mark, while leading the club to an NFC title and its second Super Bowl appearance. Under Quinn’s guidance, Atlanta built on an 8-8 season in 2015 to finish at 11-5 last season. In his first playoff appearance as a head coach, Quinn dispatched his former team, the Seattle Seahawks, in the divisional round before closing the Georgia Dome with a 44-21 defeat of the Green Bay Packers in the NFC Championship game. Despite falling to the New England Patriots, 34-28, in the NFL’s first Super Bowl decided by overtime, Quinn has built a brotherhood that is poised to challenge the NFC’s top echelon teams for years to come.

Last season, Quinn’s leadership helped produce six Pro Bowlers, including quarterback Matt Ryan, running back Devonta Freeman, wide receiver Julio Jones, center Alex Mack, outside linebacker Vic Beasley Jr., and placekicker Matt Bryant. Ryan became the first player in franchise history to be named NFL MVP and joined Jones and Beasley as Associated Press first team All-Pros. Additionally, Quinn earned the NFL’s Salute to Service award for his commitment to honoring and supporting the armed services and the military community.

Quinn’s influence on Atlanta’s young defense was clearly seen in 2016 as several first and second-year players filled key roles on the unit. His impact was perhaps clearest on Beasley, who took the NFL’s sack crown with 15.5 in his second year in the league – the second most by a Falcon in a single season since sacks became an official statistic in 1982. Quinn’s defensive line pedigree also helped lead to the emergence of defensive tackle Grady Jarrett who tied a Super Bowl record by sacking Tom Brady three times in Houston. While second-year players like Beasley and Jarrett emerged as playmakers, last season’s rookie class also made an instant impact. First-round pick Keanu Neal and second-rounder Deion Jones were both strong candidates for defensive rookie of the year after finishing as the top two tacklers among first-year players.

Atlanta's young and improving defense was buoyed by the NFL's top scoring offense in 2016. The Falcons captured their fourth NFC South title and secured the NFC's second seed in the playoffs following an 11-5 season. While the offense fired on all cylinders, Quinn's defense showed great strides over final month of the season. Atlanta allowed 25.7 points per game for its first 11 games last season. Over the final five games of the regular season that number dropped to just 20.8 points per game. In playoffs, the defense held the Seahawks and Packers to 20 and 21 points on the way to winning the NFC title.

Despite falling just short of reaching NFL's pinnacle last season, Quinn began 2017 with Everest mountaineering metaphor. His team had made a summit push and was forced back from the 29,000 ft. peak, but not all the way to zero, not to sea level. The Falcons opened the offseason at basecamp, some 12,000 feet from the summit, where they would begin to acclimatize for another run at the peak.

Quinn focused his team on owning the process of preparing and improving. This program focuses on three pillars - ball, brotherhood, and battle. The regard for the ball on offense and defense, the connection between players, and constant competition. After two seasons, Quinn said the team had moved from a neighborhood to a brotherhood. He continued his quest to create the best culture in professional sports by bringing back Acumen Preformance Group to work with his players on sharpening their mental and physical skills. Each phase of the offseason was centered around the pillars of the program and aimed at finding a way to make each player one percent better.

Co-teambuilders, Quinn and General Manager Thomas Dimitroff focused on retaining as many players from the NFC championship winning squad as possible during free agency. Atlanta tendered WR Taylor Gabriel, S Ricardo Allen, G Ben Garland, and CB Akeem King. The team then extended or re-signed six players, including QB Matt Schaub, DT Courtney Upshaw, TE Levine Toilolo, LB LeRoy Reynolds, and S Kemal Ishmael. A testament to how Quinn and Dimitroff have reshaped the club’s roster over the last two seasons, the Falcons return nine offensive starters and 18 defensive players that started at least one game.

Six players joined the brotherhood through the 2017 NFL Draft in April. Looking to bolster the pass rush, the Falcons traded up to select UCLA defensive end Takkarist McKinley in the first round. A firey competitor, McKinley adds another talented young player to Atlanta's defensive line. The club picked linebacker Duke Riley of LSU in the third round, giving them another speedy and passionate player for front seven. Switching gears to offense in the fourth round, the Falcons selected an offensive guard with NFL lineage in Oregon State's Sean Harlow. Looking to split their six picks, Quinn and Dimitroff selected San Diego State safety Damontae Kazee as the first of three fifth round picks, followed by Wyoming running back Brian Hill, and Drake tight end Eric Saubert.

In his first season at the helm Quinn led the team to a 5-0 start, becoming the first coach in franchise history to begin his career with five straight wins. Despite a mid-season slump, Quinn rallied the Falcons to wins in two of their final three games to close out the season with an 8-8 record. His defensive background was crucial in helping Atlanta improve from 32nd in total defense to 16th over one year.

Quinn headed into his second offseason with the team, contining to seek and craft a roster that highlighted speed and physicality. The team re-signed core veterans DE Adrian Clayborn and LB Philip Wheeler. These players exemplified Quinn’s fast and physical motto during his first season with the team. The Falcons also went out and added several players during the 2016 offseason who will added substance to Quinn’s program: DE Derrick Shelby, Mack, LB Sean Weatherspoon and OLB Courtney Upshaw.

During Quinn’s second draft as a NFL head coach the Falcons selected Florida safety Keanu Neal with the 17th overall pick. In the second round, the Falcons took LSU linebacker Deion Jones, Stanford tight end Austin Hooper in the third round (81st overall), Minnesota linebacker De’Vondre Campbell in the fourth round (115th overall), San Jose State guard Wes Schweitzer in the sixth round (195th overall), and UCLA wide receiver Devin Fuller in the seventh round (238th overall).

Quinn took over the club after serving as the Seattle Seahawks defensive coordinator for two seasons (2013-14), helping guide them to consecutive Super Bowl appearances. During that span, Quinn oversaw the NFL’s top defensive unit as Seattle led the League allowing 270.4 yards per game, 15.2 points per game, and 178.8 passing yards per game while holding opponents to 91.6 rushing yards per game.

In 2014, Quinn’s defense led the NFL in scoring defense (15.9), total defense (267.1), and passing yards (185.6), while ranking third in rushing yards (81.5). The Seahawks also boasted the League’s top defensive unit in 2013, en route to a win over the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XLVIII.

Quinn originally joined the Seahawks in 2009, after spending the previous six years coaching the defensive lines for the San Francisco 49ers (2003-04), Miami Dolphins (2005-06) and the New York Jets (2007-08). He previously served as the Seahawks assistant head coach/defensive line coach in 2009 under Jim Mora.

Quinn left Seattle in 2011 to become the defensive coordinator at the University of Florida where his defenses ranked in the top-10 in the country. In his first season with the Gators, his defense ranked eighth nationally in total defense (299.5), seventh in passing defense (166.8), and second in third-down defense (27.12 percent).

Prior to joining Seattle, Quinn coached the defensive line for the New York Jets from 2007-2008. In, 2008 the Jets defense ranked fifth in the NFL in yards per carry (3.7), seventh in sacks (41), and ninth in rushing yards per game (94.9). The Jets were also sixth in the AFC in yards per play (5.2) and third-down defense (38.6).

He held the same position for the Miami Dolphins for two seasons (2005-06), where Quinn helped the Dolphins rank first in the AFC and second in the NFL with 49 sacks. Miami also finished third in the AFC in yards per play (4.7) and fourth in yards per carry (3.7).

He began his NFL coaching career in San Francisco as its defensive assistant in 2001 before moving on to coach the 49ers defensive line from 2003-2004. Quinn got his start coaching the defensive line at William and Mary in 1994, followed by a season at Virginia Military Institute. He held the same position with Hofstra for four seasons before being promoted to defensive coordinator in 2000.

Quinn was a four-year letter winner and two-time co-captain at Division III Salisbury (Md.) State as a defensive lineman, where he recorded 139 tackles and eight tackles for loss. He also lettered in track and held the school record in the hammer throw. He was inducted into the Salisbury State Athletic Hall of Fame in 2005.

Quinn’s charitable foundation, Quinn’s Corps, which he and his wife, Stacey, started in 2005, serves members of the military both at home and abroad. Quinn’s foundation provides military families that are stateside with tickets to games while sending special care packages to soldiers that are deployed overseas.

Quinn was born in Morristown, New Jersey. He and his wife, Stacey, reside in Suwanee, Ga.

Dan Quinn was named the 16th head coach in Atlanta Falcons history in February of 2015. In two years, he has compiled a 19-13 regular season record and a 2-1 postseason mark, while leading the club to an NFC title and its second Super Bowl appearance. Under Quinn’s guidance, Atlanta built on an 8-8 season in 2015 to finish at 11-5 last season. In his first playoff appearance as a head coach, Quinn dispatched his former team, the Seattle Seahawks, in the divisional round before closing the Georgia Dome with a 44-21 defeat of the Green Bay Packers in the NFC Championship game. Despite falling to the New England Patriots, 34-28, in the NFL’s first Super Bowl decided by overtime, Quinn has built a brotherhood that is poised to challenge the NFC’s top echelon teams for years to come.

Last season, Quinn’s leadership helped produce six Pro Bowlers, including quarterback Matt Ryan, running back Devonta Freeman, wide receiver Julio Jones, center Alex Mack, outside linebacker Vic Beasley Jr., and placekicker Matt Bryant. Ryan became the first player in franchise history to be named NFL MVP and joined Jones and Beasley as Associated Press first team All-Pros. Additionally, Quinn earned the NFL’s Salute to Service award for his commitment to honoring and supporting the armed services and the military community.

Quinn’s influence on Atlanta’s young defense was clearly seen in 2016 as several first and second-year players filled key roles on the unit. His impact was perhaps clearest on Beasley, who took the NFL’s sack crown with 15.5 in his second year in the league – the second most by a Falcon in a single season since sacks became an official statistic in 1982. Quinn’s defensive line pedigree also helped lead to the emergence of defensive tackle Grady Jarrett who tied a Super Bowl record by sacking Tom Brady three times in Houston. While second-year players like Beasley and Jarrett emerged as playmakers, last season’s rookie class also made an instant impact. First-round pick Keanu Neal and second-rounder Deion Jones were both strong candidates for defensive rookie of the year after finishing as the top two tacklers among first-year players.

Atlanta's young and improving defense was buoyed by the NFL's top scoring offense in 2016. The Falcons captured their fourth NFC South title and secured the NFC's second seed in the playoffs following an 11-5 season. While the offense fired on all cylinders, Quinn's defense showed great strides over final month of the season. Atlanta allowed 25.7 points per game for its first 11 games last season. Over the final five games of the regular season that number dropped to just 20.8 points per game. In playoffs, the defense held the Seahawks and Packers to 20 and 21 points on the way to winning the NFC title.

Despite falling just short of reaching NFL's pinnacle last season, Quinn began 2017 with Everest mountaineering metaphor. His team had made a summit push and was forced back from the 29,000 ft. peak, but not all the way to zero, not to sea level. The Falcons opened the offseason at basecamp, some 12,000 feet from the summit, where they would begin to acclimatize for another run at the peak.

Quinn focused his team on owning the process of preparing and improving. This program focuses on three pillars - ball, brotherhood, and battle. The regard for the ball on offense and defense, the connection between players, and constant competition. After two seasons, Quinn said the team had moved from a neighborhood to a brotherhood. He continued his quest to create the best culture in professional sports by bringing back Acumen Preformance Group to work with his players on sharpening their mental and physical skills. Each phase of the offseason was centered around the pillars of the program and aimed at finding a way to make each player one percent better.

Co-teambuilders, Quinn and General Manager Thomas Dimitroff focused on retaining as many players from the NFC championship winning squad as possible during free agency. Atlanta tendered WR Taylor Gabriel, S Ricardo Allen, G Ben Garland, and CB Akeem King. The team then extended or re-signed six players, including QB Matt Schaub, DT Courtney Upshaw, TE Levine Toilolo, LB LeRoy Reynolds, and S Kemal Ishmael. A testament to how Quinn and Dimitroff have reshaped the club’s roster over the last two seasons, the Falcons return nine offensive starters and 18 defensive players that started at least one game.

Six players joined the brotherhood through the 2017 NFL Draft in April. Looking to bolster the pass rush, the Falcons traded up to select UCLA defensive end Takkarist McKinley in the first round. A firey competitor, McKinley adds another talented young player to Atlanta's defensive line. The club picked linebacker Duke Riley of LSU in the third round, giving them another speedy and passionate player for front seven. Switching gears to offense in the fourth round, the Falcons selected an offensive guard with NFL lineage in Oregon State's Sean Harlow. Looking to split their six picks, Quinn and Dimitroff selected San Diego State safety Damontae Kazee as the first of three fifth round picks, followed by Wyoming running back Brian Hill, and Drake tight end Eric Saubert.

In his first season at the helm Quinn led the team to a 5-0 start, becoming the first coach in franchise history to begin his career with five straight wins. Despite a mid-season slump, Quinn rallied the Falcons to wins in two of their final three games to close out the season with an 8-8 record. His defensive background was crucial in helping Atlanta improve from 32nd in total defense to 16th over one year.

Quinn headed into his second offseason with the team, contining to seek and craft a roster that highlighted speed and physicality. The team re-signed core veterans DE Adrian Clayborn and LB Philip Wheeler. These players exemplified Quinn’s fast and physical motto during his first season with the team. The Falcons also went out and added several players during the 2016 offseason who will added substance to Quinn’s program: DE Derrick Shelby, Mack, LB Sean Weatherspoon and OLB Courtney Upshaw.

During Quinn’s second draft as a NFL head coach the Falcons selected Florida safety Keanu Neal with the 17th overall pick. In the second round, the Falcons took LSU linebacker Deion Jones, Stanford tight end Austin Hooper in the third round (81st overall), Minnesota linebacker De’Vondre Campbell in the fourth round (115th overall), San Jose State guard Wes Schweitzer in the sixth round (195th overall), and UCLA wide receiver Devin Fuller in the seventh round (238th overall).

Quinn took over the club after serving as the Seattle Seahawks defensive coordinator for two seasons (2013-14), helping guide them to consecutive Super Bowl appearances. During that span, Quinn oversaw the NFL’s top defensive unit as Seattle led the League allowing 270.4 yards per game, 15.2 points per game, and 178.8 passing yards per game while holding opponents to 91.6 rushing yards per game.

In 2014, Quinn’s defense led the NFL in scoring defense (15.9), total defense (267.1), and passing yards (185.6), while ranking third in rushing yards (81.5). The Seahawks also boasted the League’s top defensive unit in 2013, en route to a win over the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XLVIII.

Quinn originally joined the Seahawks in 2009, after spending the previous six years coaching the defensive lines for the San Francisco 49ers (2003-04), Miami Dolphins (2005-06) and the New York Jets (2007-08). He previously served as the Seahawks assistant head coach/defensive line coach in 2009 under Jim Mora.

Quinn left Seattle in 2011 to become the defensive coordinator at the University of Florida where his defenses ranked in the top-10 in the country. In his first season with the Gators, his defense ranked eighth nationally in total defense (299.5), seventh in passing defense (166.8), and second in third-down defense (27.12 percent).

Prior to joining Seattle, Quinn coached the defensive line for the New York Jets from 2007-2008. In, 2008 the Jets defense ranked fifth in the NFL in yards per carry (3.7), seventh in sacks (41), and ninth in rushing yards per game (94.9). The Jets were also sixth in the AFC in yards per play (5.2) and third-down defense (38.6).

He held the same position for the Miami Dolphins for two seasons (2005-06), where Quinn helped the Dolphins rank first in the AFC and second in the NFL with 49 sacks. Miami also finished third in the AFC in yards per play (4.7) and fourth in yards per carry (3.7).

He began his NFL coaching career in San Francisco as its defensive assistant in 2001 before moving on to coach the 49ers defensive line from 2003-2004. Quinn got his start coaching the defensive line at William and Mary in 1994, followed by a season at Virginia Military Institute. He held the same position with Hofstra for four seasons before being promoted to defensive coordinator in 2000.

Quinn was a four-year letter winner and two-time co-captain at Division III Salisbury (Md.) State as a defensive lineman, where he recorded 139 tackles and eight tackles for loss. He also lettered in track and held the school record in the hammer throw. He was inducted into the Salisbury State Athletic Hall of Fame in 2005.

Quinn’s charitable foundation, Quinn’s Corps, which he and his wife, Stacey, started in 2005, serves members of the military both at home and abroad. Quinn’s foundation provides military families that are stateside with tickets to games while sending special care packages to soldiers that are deployed overseas.

Quinn was born in Morristown, New Jersey. He and his wife, Stacey, reside in Suwanee, Ga.